Eat Live Love Die: Selected Essays

Betty Fussell is an inspiring badass. She’s not just the award-winning author of numerous books ranging from biography and memoir to cookbooks and food history; not just a winner of the James Beard Foundation’s Journalism Award who was inducted into their “Who’s Who of American Food and Beverage” in 2009; and not just an extraordinary person whose fifty years’ worth of essays on food, travel, and the arts have appeared in scholarly journals, popular magazines and newspapers as varied as The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Los Angeles Times, Saveur, and Vogue.

This is a woman who at eighty-two years old (and despite being half-blind) went deer hunting for the very first time in the Montana foothills with her son, Sam (as described in her 2010 essay for the New York Times Magazine.) She got her deer.

This is a woman who declared in a 2005 essay for Vogue that she had to teach herself Latin and German from scratch (on top of teaching herself how to cook) as a young twenty-one year old bride, because "housewifery wasn't enough."

Raising Steaks: The Life and Times of American Beef 

In Raising Steaks, Betty Fussell saddles up for a spirited ride across America on the trail of our most iconic food. 

 

When we bite into a steak's charred crust and pink interior, Fussell finds that we bite into contradictions that have branded our national identity from the start. We taste the colliding fantasies of British pastoralists and Spanish ranchers that erupted in land wars between a wet-weather East and a desert West. We savor the ideas of wilderness and progress that clashed when we replaced buffalo with cattle, and then cowboys with industrial machines. We take in the contradictions of rugged individualism and the corporate technology that we use to breed, feed, slaughter, package, and distribute the animals we turn into meat. And we participate—as do the cattlemen and chefs, feedlot operators and rodeo stars, boot makers and scientists Fussell talks with—in the mythology that inspires cowboys to become technocrats and presidents to play cowboy.

Masters of American Cookery

Ever since American soldiers returned home after World War II with a passion for pâté and escargots instead of pork and beans, our preferences have moved from cooked to raw, from canned to fresh, from bland to savory, from water to wine. And guiding us through our culinary revolution have been four of the world's finest food experts: Julia Child, Craig Claiborne, James Beard, and M. F. K. Fisher.
 
In Masters of American Cookery, Betty Fussell demonstrates vividly how each of these chefs has made a unique and invaluable contribution to the American way of cooking and eating. In more than two hundred recipes—in chapters on appetizers, soups, salads, sauces, meats, poultry, fish, breads, cheeses and wines, and desserts—Fussell shares the artistry of these culinary masters. She also traces the evolution of each dish and provides insightful, often witty asides about the origins of the recipes.
 
In the tradition of Waverley Root and M. F. K. Fisher herself, Fussell has combined elements of history, memoir, and the cookbook to create a food lover’s delight. As entertaining as it is instructive, Masters of American Cookery belongs on the bookshelf of anyone who cares about good food. Fussell provides a preface for this Bison Books edition.
 
 
 

A Slice of Life

A Slice of Life is a collection of contemporary food writing that readers can really sink their teeth into: one that examines the ineluctable link between nourishment, literature, and society. Represented here are some of the world's best known writers, many of whom like Nigella Lawson, Julia Child, Marcella Hazan, and Anthony Bourdain are well known for their alimentary musings, while others, like Charles Simic, Roland Barthes, Umberto Eco, Wole Soyinka and Susan Sontag are better known for their writings in other genres; all speak eloquently on the nature of food, language, and the adaptability of social customs.

The Story of Corn

The Story of Corn is a unique compendium, drawing upon history and mythology, science and art, anecdote and image, personal narrative and epic to tell the extraordinary story of the grain that built the New World. Corn transformed the way the entire world eats, providing a hardy, inexpensive alternative to rice or wheat and cheap fodder for livestock and finding its way into everything from explosives to embalming fluid.

Betty Fussell has given us a true American saga, interweaving the histories of the indigenous peoples who first cultivated the grain and the European conquerors who appropriated and propagated it around the globe. She explores corn's roles as food, fetish, crop, and commodity to those who have planted, consumed, worshiped, processed, and profited from it for seven centuries.

Now available only from the University of New Mexico Press, The Story of Corn, is the winner of a Julia Child Cookbook Award from the International Association of Culinary Professionals.

THE REAL STORY

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My Kitchen Wars

My Kitchen Wars is a war story-but the warrior is a woman, the battleground is the kitchen, and the weapons are the batterie de cuisine with which Betty Fussell evokes her era's domestic battles. As much about hunger-emotional, sexual, intellectual-as it is about food, this fierce and funny memoir takes no prisoners.

Home Bistro

Are you tired of coming home after a long day's work to an uninspired dinner that barely tides you over until morning? Are you fed up with crowded restaurants, surly waiters, and overpriced meals? Acclaimed cookbook author Betty Fussell offers an accessible and exciting alternative in Home Bistro: Simple, Sensuous Fare in the Comfort of Your Own Kitchen. This creative collection of nearly 100 delectable, nohassle recipes celebrates being the master of your own culinary destiny. Learn how Orange-Cranberry Soup, Mustard-Lemon Linguine with Asparagus, or perhaps even Charred Shrimp Poblano can be on the menu of your own satisfying and delicious home-cooked meal in minutes.As practical and precise as she is unflaggingly innovative, Fussell understands that many of us don't have the time to shop for, plan, and cook elaborate menus every night of the week. Home Bistro features Betty Fussell's favorite recipes from her previous books on home cooking, Eating In and Home Plates, as well as more than 40 entirely new recipes to further tempt the palate.

THE REAL STORY

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It’s easy. Just click “Edit Text” or double click me to add your own content and make changes to the font. Feel free to drag and drop me anywhere you like on your page. I’m a great place for you to tell a story and let your users know a little more about you.​ This is a great space to write long text about your company and your services. You can use this space to go into a little more detail about your company. 

I Hear America Cooking:

The Cooks, Regions and Recipes of American Regional Cuisine

One of our most revered food writers presents the rich history and lore of American food, as experienced in her travels to six distinct regions of the country. In each of these regions, readers find communal rites and tribal dishes appropriate to the ecology--each with its own distinctive flavor, smell and feel.

Crazy for Corn

The corn-crazy author who brought us the acclaimed but recipe-less The Story of Corn returns with "the missing recipes"more than 170 great-tasting dishes that call for America's favorite grain, including a wide variety of both traditional and creative appetizers, entrees, breads, drinks, snacks, and desserts.

THE REAL STORY

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It’s easy. Just click “Edit Text” or double click me to add your own content and make changes to the font. Feel free to drag and drop me anywhere you like on your page. I’m a great place for you to tell a story and let your users know a little more about you.​ This is a great space to write long text about your company and your services. You can use this space to go into a little more detail about your company. 

Betty Fussell's Home Plates

A Shopping, Cooking, Eating, and Wine Guide For Everyday

Food In Good Season 

In this beautiful cookbook for all seasons, Betty Fussell offers 170 delicious recipes-together with advice about ingredients, historical lore, and just plain encouragement - that make for fresh and appetizing meals in every month of the year. Foods, dishes, and menus appropriate for each season, whether in city or country, south or north, are placed in the context we all know and appreciate: the living cycle of the year, and the daily round from dark January to brilliant July, from luscious August to festive December. 

Eating in

This book is designed for the person who enjoys good food and good wine but who is more used to eating out than eating in. We all know the need for a lift at the end of a long, hard day, but shopping and cooking sounds like work-more work than fighting for a cab, waiting at the bar, shouting over the din, serving the memory of test of the waiter's specials and the size of the waiter's bill.

          Here is a pocket guide you can slip into your jacket or purse to make shopping and cooking less like work and more like a pleasurable and practical alternative eating out.

Mabel: Hollywood's First Don't-Care Girl, the Life of Mabel Normand

"hollywood's first I don't care girl, first bathing beauty, first 'personality' girl, first comedy girl, first comic to begin her career in front of a camera, first pie in the face thrower, first bad luck girl, and probably first female star t direct her own film, Mabel Normand 'jazzed herself into oblivion,' dying of tuberculosis in 1930 aged 38. 

The 'queen of silent comedy,' she left a slew of unanswered questions...More than a half-century later, Betty Harper Fussellhas attempted to answer some of those questions...[and] has done a prime piece of detective work...her book has a remarkable ring of truth...[and] is a remarkable evocation of the legendary Hollywood of silent picture days. As such it's a real addition to film history."